Jim Becka Lessons
One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve (11 on Video)
Thirteen
Grocery Vocabulary
Grocery Vocabulary With Nikud
Psalms
Bible Divisions
Vocabulary 1
Vocabulary 2
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network
Network

 

Help Links

Asking Questions
Shopping Lists - 1
Shopping Lists - 2
Shopping Lists - 3
Hebrew Holiday Greetings
Lord's Prayer
Colors - Part 2
Alphabet Test 1
Hebrew Songs
Aleph Bet Rock
Aleph Bet Poster
Yeshua
Jim Becka in Jerusalem
Animal Vocabulary
Scripture
Contacts

Hebrew Class through MCN is taught free. The instructor is Jim Becka.

 

Introductory Hebrew

The Hebrew aleph bet consists of 22 basic letters. Five letters have sofit versions which means they change form when placed at the end of a word. Unlike English, Hebrew is read right to left instead of left to right. The aleph bet does not have vowels, with the exception of one letter (vav) which makes an oo or u sound. For vowels, they use nikud (Known as pointings or vowel points.) Which make a sound directly under the consonant that they are placed under/over/in.

In Israel, vowel points are not used and you must guess the vowel sound that comes after each letter. Vowel points are not necessary for individuals proficient in Hebrew.

Names of G-d

Only Temple priests were permitted to say the name of G-d. Titles were frequently substituted, such as Adonai which means ''Lord''. Many today, such as my wife D'Neece, refuse to say the name of G-d.

YHVH is the personal name of G-d and his most frequent designation, occurring over 6,800 times in the Tanakh. This is the Name of the G-d of Israel and it is composed of the four Hebrew letters Yod, Hey, Vav, and Hey. It is also referred to as the ''Tetragrammaton,'' which means ''the four letters.''

Also, many people argue over names of the Messiah. The Jews of the Second Temple, when the Messiah lived, used the name Yeshua, which means ''salvation''. Many Jewish families named their sons Yeshua in the hope their son would be the Messiah spoken of in the Tanakh. Secular Jews in Israel use the designation Yeshu, which is not Hebrew. Yehoshua was a common alternative formal form of Yeshua during the Second Temple period when the Messiah lived.